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Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

1 edition of Traditional agricultural methods in the Congo basin found in the catalog.

Traditional agricultural methods in the Congo basin

Marvin P. Miracle

Traditional agricultural methods in the Congo basin

by Marvin P. Miracle

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Published by Food Research Institute, Stanford University in Stanford, Calif .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Congo River Valley.
    • Subjects:
    • Agriculture -- Congo River Valley.

    • Edition Notes

      Statementby Marvin P. Miracle.
      ContributionsStanford University. Food Research Institute.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsS471.C75 M47
      The Physical Object
      Pagination1 v. (various pagings) :
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5976762M
      LC Control Number66003226
      OCLC/WorldCa3601049

      Colonization of the Congo refers to the European colonization of the Congo region of tropical was the last part of the continent to be colonized. By the end of the 19th century, the Congo Basin had been carved up by European colonial powers, into the Congo Free State, the French Congo and the Portuguese Congo. Congo riv er basin and to conclude treaties with local African lead ers, which in effect ceded their land to the king’s various associations, and thus to him. Meanwhile, the king collected.

        Between and , as global demand for ivory grew and poachers traded traditional hunting methods for AKs and elephant guns, an estimated three-quarters of a million elephants were killed, leaving just , survivors. Much of Africa, once home to as many as 10 million elephants, had turned into an elephant graveyard.   Prehistory and the present: palaeoenvironments in the northern Congo Basin. In Proc. Int. Conf. Congo Basin Hunter–Gatherers (ICCBHG ), Montpellier, France, 22–24 September Before Farming /2, no. 4.

      In the Congo Basin, a recent analysis of deforestation trends published by the World Bank highlights the intense pressure that agricultural expansion, mineral exploitation, growing energy needs. Congo's second civil war ended in , but ongoing conflict has left millions displaced. Two million were forced from their homes in , for instance, due to violence in the eastern part of the.


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Traditional agricultural methods in the Congo basin by Marvin P. Miracle Download PDF EPUB FB2

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Miracle, Marvin P. Traditional agricultural methods in the Congo basin.

Stanford, Calif.: Food Research Institute. Various hunter-gatherer pygmy groups inhabit the forests of the Congo basin. Most of these groups live in close association with the agriculturists, trading foods, meats, and other products.

Pygmy groups include the Baka – Aka of the Central African Republic – Republic of Congo area, the Bongo of Gabon, and the Mbuti of Ituri - northeastern. Agricultural land is difficult to define in the Congo basin, where native peoples practice shifting cultivation and small scale agriculture across the forested landscape.

The UN estimates 10% of the DRC and the Central African Republic are agricultural land; 20% for Gabon and Cameroon, and 30% for the Republic of Congo. However, Traditional agricultural methods in the Congo basin book are signs that Congo Basin forests are under increasing pressure from a variety of sources, including mineral extraction, road development, agribusiness, and biofuels, in addition to subsistence agricultural expansion and charcoal collection.

An important component of agroforestry in the Congo Basin is selecting valuable fruit trees that can produce high yields. Much of this selection is done through a process known as participatory domestication, where researchers work with communities to select varieties and adapt them for local use.

The Congo Basin is attractive for oil palm plantations because land availability for oil palm plantations is diminishing in Malaysia and Indonesia and approximately two-thirds of the total forest area of the Congo Basin has suitable soil and climate for growing oil palms, which is a native species (The Rainforest Foundation UK, ).

With about million hectares of moist forest, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is a perfect paradox of a natural resources endowed country caught in repeated economic and socio-political crises. Democratic Republic of Congo possesses about 60% of the Congo basin’s forest on which the majority of its people rely for their survival.

Even if the national forest land in the. Ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants used by traditional healers for the treatment of oxidative stress-related diseases in the Congo Basin Author links open overlay panel Mauricette Tchicaillat-Landou a b Jeremy Petit a Claire Gaiani a Edmond S.

Miabangana c André Kimbonguila b Jean-Mathurin Nzikou b Joël Scher a Louis Matos b. “The fires that are in the savannah regions, the fires caused by traditional farmers, risk getting out of control and reaching the Congo Basin.” She cites a swathe of fires in forests in Congo.

A wise man once said, before you can hope to change things, you must understand why they are the way they are. I recently bought a book called Traditional American Farming Techniques by Frank D.

Gardner which really helped me understand the “culture” of American agriculture. This book was originally published in as Successful was reprinted in by The Lyons Press. Republic of the Congo - Republic of the Congo - History: Human habitation of the Congo basin came relatively late in the Sangoan era (, to 40, bce; see Sangoan industry), perhaps because of the dense forest.

The people who used the large-core bifacial Sangoan tools probably subsisted by gathering food and digging up roots; they were not hunters. They recognize that more than 80% of the value added comes from forestry and logging and much is illegal.

Read more about illegal logging in the Congo basin from the Global Witness report Logging in the Shadows and in a Chatham House report. See more about legality verification and forest certification programs in the Congo Basin. The area and its tribal economies --Shifting cultivation in the Congo Basin --Classic tropical long-fallow systems --Ash-fertilizer-dependent long-fallow systems --Compost-dependent systems --Short-fallow systems --The rationale of traditional cropping methods --Shifting cultivation of the Congo Basin in perspective --Animal and insect.

Just like the Amazon, the forests of the Congo Basin absorb tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) in trees and peat marshes – seen by experts as a key way to combat climate change. Palm Oil in the Congo Basin Intensive agriculture in the Congo basin is rare, as forests are largely intact and transportation infrastructure is undeveloped.

In recent years following the financial crises and food crisis of however, agricultural investment in Africa has skyrocketed. The Congo Basin represents 70 percent of the African continent's forest cover and constitutes a large portion of Africa's biodiversity.

Agricultural development is a central lever to help people out of poverty, as well as a key driver of deforestation. The Congo Basin has the largest forest cover on the African continent.

Of the million hectares that the Basin comprises, about million of them are covered by forest, with 90 percent being tropical dense forests. The Congo Basin's logging sector has a dualistic configuration.

Using what limited data are available on small-scale agricultural land use in the Congo Basin, World Resources Institute’s Congo team recently replicated GLAD’s methods to map the rural complex for the Republic of Congo. This work was carried out to inform the ongoing national land use reform process in ROC and was financed by the CARPE.

The forests cover an area of million square kilometres in several countries, including about a third in the Democratic Republic of Congo, and the rest in Gabon, Congo. The Congo Basin forests are a lifeline for more than 60 million people – providing food and income for many remote communities, storing huge amounts News - 16 Nov Bushmeat Stories: Voices from the Congo Basin.

The Hunter, The Trader, The Conservationist, The Scientist. Illegal Wildlife Trade: forest elephants are primarily threatened by poaching for bushmeat and ivory. Tens of thousands of elephants are killed each year to meet the illegal international demand for ivory. Habitat loss and fragmentation: African elephants have less room to roam than ever before as expanding human populations convert land for agriculture, settlements and developments.In one of the most recent studies dedicated to traditional inland fisheries, De Graaf et al.

() point out the inaccuracy in the estimates of the worldwide fish production ensured by inland fisheries. Most importantly, statistics are nearly absent for critically important tropical areas like the Amazon and the Congo Basin. Macron's concern may be legitimate, but experts say central Africa's rainforest fires are often more seasonal and linked to traditional seasonal farming methods.

No doubt the region is key for the climate: The Congo Basin forest is commonly referred to as the "second green lung" of the planet after the Amazon.